Sous vide tongue tacos (tacos de lengua)

Even the phrase “sous vide” has the hallmarks of things most home cooks avoid. You’re not quite sure how to pronounce it, and it seems vaguely French (and therefore fussy). Well, sous vide is indeed a French phrase, but actually far from fussy. So what is sous vide? The sous vide (pronounced sue veed, meaning under vaccum) cooking…

Mexican salsas – salsa verde and salsa borracha (drunken salsa)

If you’re not astounded by how bad most store-bought salsas are, you should be. For starters, they tend to have entirely too much tomato in them. Most Mexican salsas do not have a lot of red tomatoes in them. Store-bough salsa are also often oddly sweet. Though I don’t have a bottle of Pace Picante…

Sea urchin ceviche (ceviche de erizos) – and how to open a sea urchin

Grocery shopping without a list is a terrible idea, generally speaking. Without a list to guide us through the aisles and past the ice cream, we inevitably end up with items that are unhealthy or unnecessary. For me, buying groceries sans list is especially dumb, since I can take impulse buying in grocery stores to…

The Basque region: fun and fire in Spain’s top restaurants

In my last post I focused on the pintxo, what I might consider the most fun food to eat. The playfulness and social hospitality of Basque cuisine is found beyond the pintxo bar and in some of the most revered restaurants in the world. I was lucky (and crazy) enough to eat a three of…

The Basque region: what is a pintxo and how do you say it?

There are few places on earth where you will eat better than in Northern Spain. Of course, Spain’s closest culinary competitors, Italy and France, also have excellent and world-renowned cuisine. But the approach toward food and eating in Spain, particularly the Basque country, is distinctive and I think what is responsible for its standing in…